Monkey's Paw Reading
6 days ago
moran1214
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  • Question 1
    30 seconds
    Q.

    The story is set...

    answer choices

    in a men's club.

    in an isolated house

    outside in the rain

    in a town square

  • Question 2
    30 seconds
    Q.

    How does the White family first react to the sight of the monkey’s paw?

    answer choices

    Mr. White and Herbert are interested, but Mrs. White is disgusted.

    Mr. and Mrs. White are interested, but Herbert is suspicious.

    Mrs. White is surprised, but Herbert and Mr. White are irritated.

    Mrs. White and Herbert are uninterested, but Mr. White is enthusiastic.

  • Question 3
    30 seconds
    Q.

    What does the sergeant-major think of the monkey’s paw?

    answer choices

    He thinks it is helpful.

    He thinks it is useless.

    He thinks it is entertaining.

    He thinks it is dangerous.

  • Question 4
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which of the following best describes the family’s attitude when they make their wish?

    answer choices

    hesitant

    serious

    playful

    certain

  • Question 5
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which of the following best describes how Herbert is feeling when he sits by the fire?

    answer choices

    uneasy

    lonely

    unconcerned

    hopeful

  • Question 6
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which of the following could NOT be used to describe the family’s conversation at the breakfast table?

    answer choices

    anxious

    humorous

    calm

    informal

  • Question 7
    30 seconds
    Q.

    What does the visitor reveal to Mr. and Mrs. White?

    answer choices

    Their son has broken a piece of equipment.

    Their son has been killed in an accident.

    Their son has received a promotion.

    Their son has left his job and run away.

  • Question 8
    30 seconds
    Q.

    What does Mrs. White want to do?

    answer choices

    She wants to destroy the paw by burning it.

    She wants to use the paw to get revenge on the visitor.

    She wants to get the sergeant-major to take back the paw.

    She wants to use the paw to bring their son back to life.

  • Question 9
    30 seconds
    Q.

    How does Mr. White react to his wife’s idea?

    answer choices

    He is afraid of her idea, so he hides the paw from her.

    He is curious about what will happen, so he helps her.

    He is horrified, but he does what she asks.

    He has sympathy for her, but he refuses her request.

  • Question 10
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Why does Mrs. White scream and Mr. White drop to the floor?

    answer choices

    The visitor insults their son.

    The visitor asks them for money.

    The visitor asks them to come with him to see their son.

    The visitor offers them the amount of money they had wished for.

  • Question 11
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Mrs. White believes that…

    answer choices

    a rat is making noise in the house.

    the visitor has returned.

    their son is at the door.

    she needs to help her husband.

  • Question 12
    30 seconds
    Q.

    The ending suggests that Mr. White has wished for…

    answer choices

    his son to disappear.

    his wife to stop suffering.

    their front door to open.

    the sergeant-major to leave.

  • Question 13
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which statement best expresses the theme of the story?

    answer choices

    It is not wise to trust strangers, even when they promise to be loyal to you.

    Ignoring the wisdom and experience of others can lead to terrible consequences.

    You should never give up, even if you think a problem is impossible to solve.

    You can overcome tragedy if you rely on your family and friends.

  • Question 14
    120 seconds
    Q.

    Which TWO quotes from the story best support ignoring the wisdom and experience of others can lead to terrible consequences?

    answer choices

    "he began to talk, the little family circle regarding with eager interest this visitor from distant parts, as he squared his broad shoulders in the chair and spoke of strange scenes and doughty deeds”

    “‘I won’t,’ said his friend doggedly. ‘I threw it on the fire. If you keep it, don’t blame me for what happens. Pitch it on the fire again, like a sensible man.’”

    “‘Likely,’ said Herbert, with pretend horror. ‘Why, we’re going to be rich, and famous, and happy. Wish to be an emperor, father, to begin with; then you can’t be henpecked.’”

    “Mr. White dropped his wife’s hand, and rising to his feet, gazed with a look of horror at his visitor. His dry lips shaped the words, ‘How much?’ / ‘Two hundred pounds,’ was the answer.”

    “But the days passed, and expectation gave place to resignation — the hopeless resignation of the old, sometimes miscalled, apathy. Sometimes they hardly exchanged a word, for now they had nothing to talk about, and their days were long to weariness.”

  • Question 15
    300 seconds
    Q.

    How do these paragraphs below contribute to an understanding of the mood at this point in the story?


    "They sat down by the fire again while the two men finished their pipes. Outside, the wind was higher than ever, and the old man started nervously at the sound of a door banging upstairs. A silence unusual and depressing settled upon all three, which lasted until the old couple rose to retire for the night.


    “I expect you’ll find the cash tied up in a big bag in the middle of your bed,” said Herbert, as he bade them good-night, “and something horrible squatting up on top of the wardrobe watching you as you pocket your ill-gotten gains.”


    He sat alone in the darkness, gazing at the dying fire, and seeing faces in it. The last face was so horrible and so simian that he gazed at it in amazement. It got so vivid that, with a little uneasy laugh, he felt on the table for a glass containing a little water to throw over it. His hand grasped the monkey’s paw, and with a little shiver he wiped his hand on his coat and went up to bed.


    In the brightness of the wintry sun next morning as it streamed over the breakfast table Herbert laughed at his fears. There was an air of prosaic wholesomeness about the room which it had lacked on the previous night, and the dirty, shrivelled little paw was pitched on the sideboard with a carelessness which betokened no great belief in its virtues.


    “I suppose all old soldiers are the same,” said Mrs White.


    “The idea of our listening to such nonsense! How could wishes be granted in these days? And if they could, how could two hundred pounds hurt you, father?”


    “Might drop on his head from the sky,” said the frivolous Herbert.


    “Morris said the things happened so naturally,” said his father, “that you might if you so wished attribute it to coincidence.”


    “Well, don’t break into the money before I come back,” said Herbert, as he rose from the table. “I’m afraid it’ll turn you into a mean, avaricious man, and we shall have to disown you.”


    His mother laughed, and following him to the door, watched him down the road, and returning to the breakfast table, was very happy at the expense of her husband’s credulity. All of which did not prevent her from scurrying to the door at the postman’s knock, nor prevent her from referring somewhat shortly to retired sergeant-majors of bibulous habits when she found that the post brought a tailor’s bill."

    answer choices

    The create a suspenseful mood with details about the old man’s nightmares and Mrs. White’s concern.

    They establish a cheerful mood to show how the family feels about their wish being granted.

    They build on the gloomy mood that was established in Part I of the story.

    They show that the mood has changed from disturbing to light-hearted.

  • Question 16
    120 seconds
    Q.

    Which TWO details best support the mood has changed from disturbing to light-hearted?

    answer choices

    "The last face was so horrible and so simian that he gazed at it in amazement. It got so vivid that, with a little uneasy laugh, he felt on the table for a glass containing a little water to throw over it.”

    “as [sunlight] streamed over the breakfast table Herbert laughed at his fears.”

    “the dirty, shriveled little paw was pitched on the sideboard with a carelessness which betokened no great belief in its virtues.”

    “‘I suppose all soldiers are the same,’ said Mrs. White. ‘The idea of our listening to such nonsense!’”

    "‘I’m afraid it’ll turn you into a mean, avaricious man, and we shall have to disown you.’”

  • Question 17
    300 seconds
    Q.

    How does the dialogue below develop the plot of the story?


    “I — was asked to call,” he said at last, and stooped and picked a piece of cotton from his trousers. “I come from Maw and Meggins.”


    The old lady started. “Is anything the matter?” she asked breathlessly. “Has anything happened to Herbert? What is it? What is it?”


    Her husband interposed. “There, there, mother,” he said hastily. “Sit down, and don’t jump to conclusions. You’ve not brought bad news, I’m sure, sir” and he eyed the other wistfully.


    “I’m sorry — ” began the visitor.


    “Is he hurt?” demanded the mother.


    The visitor bowed in assent. “Badly hurt,” he said quietly, “but he is not in any pain.”


    “Oh, thank God!” said the old woman, clasping her hands. “Thank God for that! Thank — ”


    She broke off suddenly as the sinister meaning of the assurance dawned upon her and she saw the awful confirmation of her fears in the other’s averted face. She caught her breath, and turning to her slower-witted husband, laid her trembling old hand upon his. There was a long silence.


    “He was caught in the machinery,” said the visitor at length, in a low voice.


    “Caught in the machinery,” repeated Mr. White, in a dazed fashion, “yes.”


    He sat staring blankly out at the window, and taking his wife’s hand between his own, pressed it as he had been wont to do in their old courting days nearly forty years before.


    “He was the only one left to us,” he said, turning gently to the visitor. “It is hard.”


    The other coughed, and rising, walked slowly to the window. “The firm wished me to convey their sincere sympathy with you in your great loss,” he said, without looking round. “I beg that you will understand I am only their servant and merely obeying orders.”


    There was no reply; the old woman’s face was white, her eyes staring, and her breath inaudible; on the husband’s face was a look such as his friend the sergeant might have carried into his first action.


    “I was to say that Maw and Meggins disclaim all responsibility,” continued the other. “They admit no liability at all, but in consideration of your son’s services they wish to present you with a certain sum as compensation.”


    Mr. White dropped his wife’s hand, and rising to his feet, gazed with a look of horror at his visitor. His dry lips shaped the words, “How much?”


    “Two hundred pounds,” was the answer.

    answer choices

    It reveals that Mr. White’s wish has been granted but not in the way they expected.

    It shows that the visitor is uncomfortable with what he has to say, even though he is bringing a gift.

    It suggests that Mrs. White is concerned about her husband and takes steps to help him deal with the news he’s received.

    It shows the sergeant-major reappearing in the story and causing more problems within the family.

  • Question 18
    120 seconds
    Q.

    Which TWO excerpts from the story best support their differing points of view and resulting argument create suspense around what choice they will make and how they will respond to the knock at their door?

    answer choices

    “It was about a week after that that the old man, waking suddenly in the night, stretched out his hand and found himself alone. The room was in darkness, and the sound of subdued weeping came from the window.”

    ‘Get it,’ she panted; ‘get it quickly, and wish — Oh, my boy, my boy!’ / Her husband struck a match and lit the candle. ‘Get back to bed,’ he said unsteadily. ‘You don’t know what you are saying.’”

    “Neither spoke, but both lay silently listening to the ticking of the clock. A stair creaked, and a squeaky mouse scurried noisily through the wall.” (Paragraph 128) “His wife sat up in bed listening. A loud knock resounded through the house. / ‘It’s Herbert!’ she screamed. ‘It’s Herbert!’”

    “But her husband was on his hands and knees groping wildly on the floor in search of the paw. If he could only find it before the thing outside got in.”

    A cold wind rushed up the staircase, and a long loud wail of disappointment and misery from his wife gave him courage to run down to her side, and then to the gate beyond. The street lamp flickering opposite shone on a quiet and deserted road.”

  • Question 19
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which word best describes hinting on something that will happen in the future?

    answer choices

    genre

    flashback

    foreshadowing

    tone

  • Question 20
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which quote BEST contributes the use of foreshadowing from the story's overall meaning?

    answer choices

    "A cold wind rushed up the staircase, and a long loud wail of disappointment and misery from his wife gave him courage to run down to her side, and then to the gate beyond. The street lamp flickering opposite shone on a quiet and deserted road.”

    “All of which did not prevent her from scurrying to the door at the postman’s knock, nor prevent her from referring somewhat shortly to retired sergeant-majors of bibulous habits”

    "If you keep it, don’t blame me for what happens” and “I warn you of the consequences”

    “‘I’m afraid it’ll turn you into a mean, avaricious man, and we shall have to disown you.’”

  • Question 21
    30 seconds
    Q.

    What is "The Monkey's Paw" about?

    answer choices

    a retired sergeant major who brings a magical monkey's paw from India

    an unsuspecting son who dies as a result of his mother's greed.

    a monkey's paw that grants three wishes to three different people

    a magical but evil monkey's paw that ruins the quiet life of a family

  • Question 22
    30 seconds
    Q.

    The story is in the genre of

    answer choices

    tragedy

    comedy

    horror

    satire

  • Question 23
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which of the following phrases from "The Monkey's Paw" best describes the Whites' lives before the first wish is granted?

    answer choices

    "wild scenes and doughty deeds"

    "an air of prosaic wholesomeness"

    "steeped in a shadow and silence"

    "the hopeless resignation of the old"

  • Question 24
    30 seconds
    Q.

    In "The Monkey's Paw," which of the following lines spoken by Mr. White hints that the wishes can only change his life for the worse?

    answer choices

    "And what is there special about it?"

    "It seems to me I've got all I want."

    "...there's no harm done, but it gave me a shock all the same."

    "...the things happened so naturally...."

  • Question 25
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which of the following lines from "The Monkey's Paw" is an example of foreshadowing?

    answer choices

    "When he went away he was a slip of a youth in the warehouse."

    "I should like to see those old temples and fakirs and jugglers..."

    "The monkey's paw has caused enough mischief already."

    "Did you give him anything for it, Father?"

  • Question 26
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Which of the following lines from "The Monkey's Paw" foreshadows what happens to Herbert?

    answer choices

    "...I don't see the money... and I bet I never shall."

    "Why, we're going to be rich, and famous and happy."

    "I expect you'll find the cash tied up in a big bag..."

    "If you only cleared the house, you'd be quite happy..."

  • Question 27
    30 seconds
    Q.

    In "The Monkey's Paw." when a stranger comes to the Whites' door, Mrs. White thinks at first he has come to

    answer choices

    announce Herbert's death

    give Mr. White 200 pounds

    asks them for the monkey's paw.

    present a bill from the tailor

  • Question 28
    30 seconds
    Q.

    In "The Monkey's Paw," Herbert is "...caught in the machinery..." In this context, machinery may also indicate the effects of ________.

    answer choices

    destiny

    carelessness

    everyday life

    industrialization

  • Question 29
    30 seconds
    Q.

    Why is Mr. White afraid to wish a second time?

    answer choices

    He does not believe the paw grant wishes.

    He is so grief stricken that he forgets the paw

    He has become apathetic since Herbert's death.

    He realizes his wishes can have only bad consequences

  • Question 30
    30 seconds
    Q.

    At the end of "The Monkey's Paw," what does Mrs. White realize just after she opens the front door?

    answer choices

    Her husband has made the third wish.

    The monkey's paw killed her son.

    She no longer wants her son to return

    The knocking sound is not Herbert

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