What Tales Tell: Apple of Discord
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12 QuestionsShow answers
  • Question 1
    30 seconds
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    Q.

    "Lofty Olympians" is what Eris calls

    answer choices

    the athletes on Mount Olympus.

    anyone who believes she is not a goddess.

    the gods and goddesses who exclude her.

    mortals who think they are immortal.

  • Question 2
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    Q.

    Where does Eris go "uninvited"?

    answer choices

    to the sea queen's wedding

    to Mount Olympus

    to an apple orchard

    to visit Aphrodite

  • Question 3
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    Q.

    The line "goddess-strewn lawn" is an example of

    answer choices

    double meaning.

    humor and exaggeration.

    a theme in the poem.

    a refrain in the poem.

  • Question 4
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    Q.

    What is Eris's "wedding surprise"?

    answer choices

    a bull on an alter

    a gold apple inscribed "for the fairest"

    a gift to her from Hera and Athena

    a rope for tugging and pulling

  • Question 5
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    Q.

    What does the word "commotion" mean in line 19 mean?

    answer choices

    a small, quite disagreement

    a battle using weapons

    a loud and noticeable quarrel

    a kind of wedding dance

  • Question 6
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    Q.

    Who are "Earth's glorious sons" in the poem?

    answer choices

    the lesser immortals, like Eris

    the brave, innocent heroes

    the ones who let Troy burn

    the guilty ones

  • Question 7
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    Q.

    Which effect do the words "squabble" and "tugging and pulling" NOT have in the poem?

    answer choices

    The words make the goddesses seem like children.

    The words create a childish, bickering tone.

    The words help readers see how the goddesses are behaving.

    The words show the goddesses as dignified and important.

  • Question 8
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    Q.

    Who are "they who destroy" in the poem?

    answer choices

    all mortals and immortals

    the goddesses Hera, Athena, and vain Aphrodite

    Eris and the lesser immortals

    all the wedding guests

  • Question 9
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    Q.

    The poet writes the poem

    answer choices

    to make the myth seem very important.

    to explain all the events of The Illiad.

    to show Eris's point of view.

    to explain all gods and goddesses.

  • Question 10
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    Q.

    Which lines most clearly show that the poem is a parody?

    answer choices

    "So I came, uninvited, / to the sea queen's wedding"

    "far out on the spreading/ goddess-strewn lawn"

    "To their lasting shame,/they let Troy burn.

    "they who destroy,/who sacrifice heroes."

  • Question 11
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    Q.

    What does Eris mean in the lines "...They claim/I'm the foul one!" and describe the tone?

    answer choices

    It shows that the goddesses are the foul ones, not her. The tone is sarcastic.

    It shows that Eris knows she is to blame for the fall of Troy. The tone is guilt.

    It shows that Eris thinks the goddesses are ridiculous. The tone is mocking.

  • Question 12
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    Q.

    "The gods are hardheaded;/they never learn" means

    answer choices

    The gods and goddesses are humble and think life is all about doing what is right.

    The gods and goddesses are unaware and uncaring about the damage they cause, especially to mortals.

    The gods and goddesses care about both mortals and immortals.

    The gods and goddesses should have known better than to act childish and quarrel over a golden apple.

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